Select Grade Blackwood Timber for >$10,000 per cubic metre!

Wandering around the internet and here’s the first blackwood timber price list for the new year. This price list is for dressed select grade blackwood timber from a timber retailer in Sydney.trenddbwd

It contains a limited range of sizes.

It also contains little by way of volumetric price increases with increasing timber size to reflect the fact that larger dimension timber can only come from larger trees which take longer to grow and therefore should cost more.

What is shown here are select grade blackwood volumetric prices for the first time getting well into the 5 figures!!

I wonder when Tasmanian farmers will begin to take notice?

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9 responses to “Select Grade Blackwood Timber for >$10,000 per cubic metre!

  1. Where are these prices from, Gordon?

  2. I wish it was widely available.

    • Hi,

      After years of overcutting the public native forest resource blackwood will soon be commercially extinct. It seems that very few people are interested in supporting Tasmanian farmers to grown commercial blackwood. Even $10,000 a cubic metre doesn’t raise any interest.

      It’s a funny old world!

      Gordon

      • A couple of points are worth considering:

        a/ What could a grower earn from wood that he or she has grown and value added through onfarm milling, drying etc?

        b/ What does $10k/m3 retail mean to onfarm log value.

        The return the grower receives is likely to be a primary incentive to grow trees.

      • Hi David,

        I agree completely with your comments.

        a/ The examples of both Rowan Reid (Vic) and Malcolm Mackenzie (NZ) indicate that initially while volumes are low and growers few, onfarm processing will provide the best chance of realizing some value from farm grown timber. This is especially in Rowan’s case where he is growing species which are new to the local market (ie. no market history/experience). Once the number of growers increases and the volumes harvested start to increase then bigger markets can be accessed directly through log sales.

        b/ There are lots of variables to consider in answering that question, but if radiata pine sells at $2600/m3 retail and provides a positive return to the grower then surely $10k/m3 must be a good investment, especially if you already own the land.

        “The return the grower receives is likely to be a primary incentive to grow trees.”

        That quote needs to be cast in bronze and displayed prominently all around Australia, especially at sawmills and at universities where forest science is taught. The residents of Heyfield in Gippsland and the employees at Australian Sustainable Hardwoods need to also contemplate the meaning of those wise words.

        Cheers

        Gordon

      • Rowan sold the 6 nitens logs for veneer a while ago. From his Facebook feed and other sources he’s felled and milled a few trees of various species but not much info on what wood has been sold and at what price.

        There is an agroforester in Sth Gippsland who grows pine and mills onsite. My understanding is that he is making a quid. I looked at growing pine on our site. But with respect to selling logs, after all the harvest/transport costs there wasn’t much money left for a small-scale grower based on what information I could find on indicative local sawlog and pulp prices. And no premium offered for pruned/clearwood sawlog.

        The situation seems a bit different in NZ. IMO it would be very useful to bring someone knowledgeable over from NZ to speak on why agroforestry has been so successful there and compare and contrast with SE Australia.

      • Hi David,

        I agree completely with your comments.

        a/ The examples of both Rowan Reid (Vic) and Malcolm Mackenzie (NZ) indicate that initially while volumes are low and growers few, onfarm processing will provide the best chance of realizing some value from farm grown timber. This is especially in Rowan’s case where he is growing species which are new to the local market (ie. no market history/experience). Once the number of growers increases and the volumes harvested start to increase then bigger markets can be accessed directly through log sales.

        b/ There are lots of variables to consider in answering that question, but if radiata pine sells at $2600/m3 retail and provides a positive return to the grower then surely $10k/m3 must be a good investment, especially if you already own the land.

        “The return the grower receives is likely to be a primary incentive to grow trees.”

        That quote needs to be cast in bronze and displayed prominently all around Australia, especially at sawmills and at universities where forest science is taught. The residents of Heyfield in Gippsland and the employees at Australian Sustainable Hardwoods need to also contemplate the meaning of those wise words.

        Cheers

        Gordon

      • Hi David,

        I agree completely with your comments.

        a/ The examples of both Rowan Reid (Vic) and Malcolm Mackenzie (NZ) indicate that initially while volumes are low and growers few, onfarm processing will provide the best chance of realizing some value from farm grown timber. This is especially in Rowan’s case where he is growing species which are new to the local market (ie. no market history/experience). Once the number of growers increases and the volumes harvested start to increase then bigger markets can be accessed directly through log sales.

        b/ There are lots of variables to consider in answering that question, but if radiata pine sells at $2600/m3 retail and provides a positive return to the grower then surely $10k/m3 must be a good investment, especially if you already own the land.

        “The return the grower receives is likely to be a primary incentive to grow trees.”

        That quote needs to be cast in bronze and displayed prominently all around Australia, especially at sawmills and at universities where forest science is taught. The residents of Heyfield in Gippsland and the employees at Australian Sustainable Hardwoods need to also contemplate the meaning of those wise words.

        Cheers

        Gordon

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