Category Archives: Island Specialty Timbers

The burning of Notre Dame and Tasmanian Special Timbers

NotreDameFire

The burning of Notre Dame Cathedral in Paris on 15/4/2019 provides the perfect metaphor for the continuing destruction of Tasmania’s natural heritage.

The world was horrified that the 800 year old World Heritage Listed cathedral was on fire. How could humanity lose such a treasure?

But here in Tasmania 800+ year old heritage is destroyed every single day!

Here in Tasmania 800+ year old trees are cut down every day, at taxpayer expense, to provide a lowly subsistence for the rent seekers in the Tasmanian special timbers industry; sawmillers, furniture makers, luthiers, craftsmen, shop keepers, etc..

Trees such as Celery Top Pine (Phyllocladus aspleniifolius) and Myrtle (Nothofagus cunninghamii) live within Tasmania’s cool temperate rainforest and can live for 800-1000 years, germinating long before Bishop Maurice de Sully commenced the construction of Notre Dame in 1160.

Some of these trees are even in designated Conservation Reserves that were specifically established to protect these very same ancient trees and forests.

Such is the perverse corrupt nature of public native forestry and politics in the island State of Tasmania.

https://www.stategrowth.tas.gov.au/energy_and_resources/forestry/special_species_timber_management_plan

The public response to the damage at Notre Dame has been nothing but extraordinary. €100s millions have been pledged by individuals to rebuild Notre Dame and restore this international treasure.

Meanwhile in Tasmania these 800+ year old trees are destroyed with no process transparency, no FSC certification, at considerable public expense and no thought for the heritage that is being destroyed.

These people are the Notre Dame arsonists of Tasmania:

http://livingwoodtasmania.org.au/

https://www.facebook.com/TasmanianSpecialTimbersAlliance/

and many, many more. They number in the thousands in Tasmania!

Advertisements

Public Notification

To:          Interested Parties

From:    SCS Global Services

Date:     8 April 2019

Re:         Notification of Planned FSC Certification Evaluation of Sustainable Timber Tasmania

Summary:  As part of an upcoming Forest Stewardship Council™ (FSC®) certification evaluation, SCS is currently seeking stakeholder input regarding the forest management program and practices of Sustainable Timber Tasmania.  Please comment via email or contact our offices (contact information below).

In pursuit of Forest Stewardship Council (FSC) endorsed forest management certification, Sustainable Timber Tasmania will be undergoing an audit on the full weeks of 20 and 27 May 2019.  The audit will be conducted by SCS Global Services, a FSC-accredited certification body. The Forest Stewardship Council is a non-profit organization devoted to encouraging the responsible management of the world’s forests. FSC sets standards that ensure forestry is practiced in an environmentally responsible, socially beneficial, and economically viable way.

Sustainable Timber Tasmania (STT) is a Tasmanian Government Business Enterprise responsible for sustainably managing  public production forest (Permanent Timber Production Zone land) and undertaking forest operations for the production and sale of forest products from these forests.

The 812 000 ha PTPZ land is approximately 12% of the Tasmanian land area. PTPZ land includes 375,000 ha of native forest that is available for wood production. It also includes 120,000 ha that contributes to Tasmania’s Comprehensive, Adequate and Representative Reserve system and a further 200,000 ha of non-production forest. STT manages 28,000 ha of plantation, comprising both hardwood eucalypts and softwood.

STT is seeking FSC certification for approximately 713,000 ha, the remaining PTPZ land area is managed either by third parties or is not eligible for FSC Forest Management certification due to its plantation conversion history.

Scope and Certification Evaluation Process

SCS Global Services (SCS), a FSC-accredited certification body based in California, will conduct this FSC Main Evaluation.

Performance will be evaluated against the The FSC National Forest Stewardship Standard of Australia (v1-0; 2018).  A copy of the standard is attached to this message.

The evaluation process includes the following components:

  • Public notification: distribution of the standard and solicitation of comments on the certification applicant; Audit planning and document review;
  • Field assessment: A representative sample of field sites and operations within the defined forest area are inspected by a team of auditors;
  • Stakeholder consultation is carried out prior to and during the field assessment;
  • Synthesis of findings: conformity to the standard is ascertained and the certification decision is formulated;
  • Reporting: a draft report describing the evaluation process, findings, and certification decision is produced;
  • Peer review: the draft evaluation report is peer reviewed by 2 independent natural resource professionals;
  • Finalization of the report and conveyance to the SCS Certification Committee for the final certification decision;
  • Certification decision: the final report and certification decision is conveyed to the applicant; a public summary of the certification report is released if certification is awarded.

Call for Public Participation

SCS is seeking comments on the forest management of Sustainable Timber Tasmania or other topics pertinent to their seeking FSC certification, such as whether Sustainable Timber Tasmania complies with the legal, social, technical, and environmental requirements of the standard or identification of high conservation value forests[1] within its managed lands.  Comments can be submitted via email to FSCConsultation@scsglobalservices.com, standard mail, or facsimile. All comments and sources will be kept in strict confidence at the request of the commenter.  Also, please feel welcome to forward this message on to other stakeholders that you think may have an interest in sharing their perspective on this assessment.

Date of the Evaluation

The field evaluation is scheduled to start 20 May 2019.  When possible, SCS will make arrangements to meet with interested parties during the evaluation if appropriate, but it is preferred that comments are submitted before the field evaluation commences.

Dispute Resolution Procedure

As provided by the FSC Interim Dispute Resolution Protocol and the SCS Forest Conservation Program Quality Manual, dispute resolution procedures are in place and available to interested parties at http://www.scsglobalservices.com/your-feedback.

Additional Information

More information about FSC and SCS can be obtained from www.fsc.org and www.SCSglobalServices.com. Information about Sustainable Timber Tasmania can be found athttps://www.sttas.com.au/.

Please Contact Us
Robert Hrubes Brendan Grady
FSC Lead Auditor SCS Director of Forest Management
2000 Powell St, Suite 600; Emeryville CA 94608, USA
Tel +1 (510)452-8034, Fax +1 (510) 452-6882
FSCConsultation@scsglobalservices.com

.  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  

Evan Poirson | Program Associate, Forest Management Certification

I wonder if that’s a Tasmanian record?

blackheart

At the recent January 2019 IST log tender a single black hearted sassafras log sold for $10,100!!

I wonder if that is a record price for a native forest log in Tasmania?

https://www.islandspecialtytimbers.com.au/

The log had the following measurements:

Length: 5.2 metres

Small end diameter: 71 cm

Large end diameter: 85 cm

Volume: 2.48 cubic metres

Unit Price: $4,075 per cubic metre

Black hearted sassafras is a slow growing rainforest tree native to Tasmania and Victoria.

Most black heart sassafras timber comes from unsustainable, taxpayer funded, public native forest logging in Tasmania, including the Government approved logging of Conservation Reserves.

Most Tasmanians and Australians don’t seem to care about Tasmanian forests!

Anyway it is an extraordinary price for a log.

IST Tender Results 2017-18

It’s time for my annual summary of Island Specialty Timbers (IST) log tender results.

http://www.islandspecialtytimbers.com.au/

This is the only competitive market forest log price data publically available anywhere in Australia.

General

During the year Island Specialty Timbers conducted 7 tenders putting a total of 154 cubic metres of special species logs, craftwood and sawn wood to tender.

Total sold volume was 99.8 cubic metres (65%).

Total tender revenue was $90,900.

201718ISTpricechart

The above chart shows the log volumes and log prices paid per tender. Craftwood and sawn wood are not included in this chart.

The large volume of unsold logs at the April 2018 tender was mostly due to a large parcel of Silver wattle (Acacia dealbata) logs.

201718ISTlogsizechart

The above chart shows the average volume of logs sold at tender by IST. For some context to this chart, the target plantation blackwood log is 1.5 cubic metres in volume (DBH 60 cm pruned to 6 metres). So it can be seen most of the IST logs sold at tender are small to very small in size.

The highlights for the year were a) a tiny black heart sassafras log (1.1m length, 30 cm small end diameter, 0.07 cubic metres volume) that sold for $3,800 per cubic metre. Indeed at this August 2017 tender 5 small BH sassafras logs totalling 0.54 cubic metres sold for a total of $2,025; and b) a very large huon pine log (4.3 cubic metres) sold for a total $4,623.

Two species attracted strong demand and high prices during the year, these being black heart sassafras (BHS) and huon pine, with average log prices well over $1,000 per cubic metre. BHS and huon pine made up 21% and 13% respectively of the sold volume. Blackwood and feature eucalypt/tas oak were the other major sellers at 18% and 23% of sold volume.

In fact 2 tear-drop grain tas oak logs sold for over $1,700 per cubic metre, an extraordinary price for a wood that the market generally regards as a cheap commodity.

Celery top pine sold for an average $580 per cubic metre (3.7 cubic metres total sold).

Silver wattle and blackwood made up 76% and 15% respectively of the unsold volume for the year.

So what can we say with three years of IST tender results in the chart?

Answer: Not much!

There is no apparent trend in price over the last 3 years. Sure the volumes are small, the market is restricted and the quality of produce is highly variable.

What can be said is that even given these limitations the market will pay very good prices for quality wood when it wants to, with maximum prices averaging $3,000 per cubic metre, even for tiny logs!

These tendered log volumes represent less than 1% of the special timbers annual harvest, and a mere 0.01% of the wood harvested annually from public native forest in Tasmania. The rest is sold at Government (non-market) prices on long term, perpetual sales contracts.

According to Forestry Tasmania’s Annual Report in 2016/17 IST sold a total of 829 cubic metres of product [tender and direct sales]. The annual report does not give separate accounts for IST so their income and costs are unknown.

Blackwood

Log8 102017a

In general the IST tender results provide little information that is useful to the marketplace with the exception of blackwood. Tasmanian blackwood is the only Tasmanian “special species” that has the potential to be grown commercially; the other species being too slow growing.

Sixteen blackwood logs (23.5 cubic metres) were put to tender in 2017-18 of which 10 were sold (16.3 cubic metres) for a total of $12,210.

Five of the sold logs (7.6 cubic metres), described as having figured grain, sold for a total of $7,460. These logs averaged 5.2 metres length, 57 cm small end diameter and 1.5 cubic metres volume.

The 5 plain grain logs (8.7 cubic metres) sold for a total of $4,754, an average price of $545 per cubic metre. These five logs averaged 6.0 metres in length, 54 cm small end diameter and 1.7 cubic metres volume. In other words these were good size, quality logs equivalent to what can be grown in a well managed blackwood plantation, which would produce approx. 300 cubic metres of high quality sawlog per hectare at harvest.

This is a very good price and a substantial increase on the last three years.

ISTBWDchart1718

The stand out blackwood results for the year were a) $1,300 per cubic metre for a 1.76 cubic metre log containing tear-drop figured grain, and b) $2,467 total price for a very large (2.53 cubic metre) figured log.

The unsold blackwood logs consisted of a) one huge figured grain log measuring 5.7m length 75 cm small end diametre and 3.4 cubic metre volume, and b) 5 plain grain logs averaging 4.3 metres length, 46 cm small end diameter and 0.8 cubic metres volume.

Remember these are tiny volumes in a small market (southern Tasmania). Whether they represent the broader blackwood market is unknown.

Remember these prices are “mill door” equivalent prices with harvesting and transport costs already “included”. They are not stumpage prices.

Also remember that Sustainable Timbers Tasmania/IST is a taxpayer funded community service organisation bringing these timbers to market from Tasmania’s public native oldgrowth and rainforests:

Tasmanian regional forest agreement delivers $1.3bn losses in ‘giant fraud’ on taxpayers

Another blackwood timber price list

Here’s a blackwood timber price list for a timber retailer in Tasmania.

This sawmiller/retailer specialises in Tasmanian “specialty timbers”.

These timbers obviously come from Tasmanian public native forest, which as everyone should know by now, comes to market at great cost to Tasmanian taxpayers and the plundering of the last of our oldgrowth and rainforest.

https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2018/mar/29/tasmanian-forest-agreement-delivers-13bn-losses-in-giant-on-taxpayers

These prices are for individually priced boards, kiln dried and dressed, select grade (ie. Knot-free plain grain).

I’ve sorted these boards by the wood volume per metre, which seems to provide the best (but by no means perfect) explanation for the variation in price. The other curiosity besides the odd pricing structure is the diverse range of dimensions.

Note the variation in price for the boards of the same dimension eg. 310 x 32mm.

Given that timber is sold in Australia just on a price and NOT price per m or price per cubic metre, most customers would not spot this fraudulent behaviour.

Buyer beware!

ZXSJT

That this sawmiller is getting away with selling select grade blackwood for $8,000 per cubic metre should get some tongues wagging (I hope!).

The fact that getting this timber to market costs Tasmanian taxpayers is the criminal aspect of all this. Welcome to the Tasmanian forest industry!

IST Special Timbers Tender 6 Monthly Update

Here is my 6 monthly report of IST special timbers tender results. My last report can be found here:

https://blackwoodgrowers.com.au/2017/07/27/ist-tender-results-2016-17/

The last 6 months have seen Island Specialty Timbers conduct 3 tenders with total of 42 cubic metres of product put to tender.

http://www.islandspecialtytimbers.com.au/

Total tendered volume sold was 34 cubic metres (81%) with total revenue of $34,000.

IST1217Chart1

The chart shows the price and volume trends over the last 2 years for the IST special timbers tenders. Sawn timber products are not included in the chart. Unfortunately the diversity and quality of products put to tender are so variable, and the volumes so small, that very little analysis is possible; except to say that the market is prepared to pay very high prices for premium quality wood.

Remember these prices are equivalent to mill door log prices, so harvesting and transport costs are theoretically included in the prices.

That these logs from Tasmanian public native forests are subsidised by Tasmanian taxpayers may also have some influence on the price.

The following chart tracks the average sold log volume. Many of the logs sold are very small. For comparison a target plantation blackwood log pruned to 6 metres with a dbh of 60 cm would have a volume of 1.5 cubic metres.

IST1217Chart2

With the Tasmanian State Government now giving away special timbers at taxpayers’ expense from Tasmania’s conservation reserves under the new Special Timbers Management Plan, we can expect log prices to drop dramatically.

Private forest growers are in for a tough time.

In fact I would think that IST’s days are well and truly numbered.

https://blackwoodgrowers.com.au/2017/10/23/tasmanian-rainforest-plunder/

Island Specialty Timbers, (IST) an enterprise of Forestry Tasmania was established at Geeveston in 1992 to increase the recovery, availability and value of specialty timbers from harvesting activities in State forests.

So much for “enterprise”! So much for “value”!!

More like complete market destruction.

 

Since this is my final report for 2017 I’ll take the opportunity to wish readers the best of Seasons Greetings.

The New Year brings another divisive and destructive State Election for Tasmania with forest policy yet again a hot election issue.

When will Tasmania get a fully commercial, profitable forest industry?

IST Tender Results 2016-17 addendum

https://blackwoodgrowers.com.au/2017/07/27/ist-tender-results-2016-17/

Looking at how small some of the IST tendered logs are, I thought I’d create a chart showing average sold log volume.

ISTSoldVol

For some context to this chart, the target plantation blackwood log is 1.5 cubic metres in volume (DBH 60 cm pruned to 6 metres).

So you can see from the above chart that IST sold logs are pretty small. In fact given that the chart shows the average volume, some of them are downright tiny (less than 0.1cubic metres).

That these small logs can command such high prices is quite extraordinary.

I’ll include this chart in future reports.